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Nomad ChargeKey review: a must-have iPhone charger for your keychain

ChargeKey_hero-3When it comes to my phone, I’m not a big accessories guy. I own a spare charging cable and way too many cases, but no crazy docks, speakers, camera lenses, alarm clocks, styli, or game controllers. However, after spending a week testing Nomad’s ChargeKey, it has become the one iPhone accessory I will never leave home without.

Simply put, the ChargeKey is a tiny Lightning cable for your iPhone 5 or 5S. It’s designed and shaped like a house key, and it’s meant to live on your keychain so you always have it with you. It’s an emergency charger for those panic moments when you’re out and about and your battery hits the red. On one end is a standard USB to plug into a computer, external battery pack, or even a wall charger, and on the other end is an Apple-certified Lightning connector. Plug the ChargeKey into your laptop, connect the Lightning end to your phone, and voila – you’re charging. Plain and simple. The ChargeKey also works with most other Lightning-equipped Apple devices, including the iPhone 5C, the iPad Air, and iPad mini.

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Evomail+ for iPhone arrives as a rebuilt, redesigned email client for iOS 7

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I think it’s safe to say we all have a love/hate relationship with our email. We either get too much of it to deal with, we hate the way it works, or we hate the app we are forced to use to get it. Personally, I don’t hate email itself, and I usually don’t get very much of it. But like many people, I hate the apps I have to use to get my email. Apple’s Mail.app on iOS and OS X is barebones, tired, and does not support modern email features like labels and stars. I don’t like web apps, so I refuse to use Gmail, Hotmail, or IMAP in a browser. Google’s Gmail app for Android is pretty good, but their stock “other” Mail app leaves much to be desired. And don’t even get me started on Microsoft Outlook.

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13-inch Macbook Pro with Retina display (2013) Review

13rMBP2013There are some products that are great, and then there are some that just hit that elusive sweet spot. Last week, I picked up the newest version of the 13-inch Macbook Pro with Retina display (rMBP), Apple’s latest and greatest laptop. Here are the specs of the mid range model ($1499):

  • 2.4GHz dual-core Intel Core i5
  • 8GB of RAM
  • 256GB PCIe-based flash storage
  • Intel Iris Graphics
  • Nine hour battery life
  • 802.11ac WiFi, 3.46 pounds, 0.71 inches thick

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Magna Carta Holy Grail Exhibit
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The Tainted Holy Grail

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When an iconic musician like a Jay-Z releases a record in this day and age, there are two assurances; the album will be feverishly discussed, criticized, and picked over, and it will leak. Back in 2011, Jay-Z and Kanye West changed the rules of the game when their collaborative album Watch The Throne was released on iTunes a week ahead of its physical release to brick and mortar outlets, becoming one of the first major acts to avoid the previously inevitable leak altogether. Building upon that success, Jay-Z decided to change the rules once again, striking a deal with Samsung, which was both concurrently astounding (for Jay-Z) and mind-blowingly inept (for Samsung).

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The Significance of Yeezus

Yeezus

For the last few days, I’ve had the privilege of digesting Yeezus, the newest project from Kanye West. After running through the album numerous times, there are three things that are very clear about what Yeezus is and will mean to music.

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LensMag by Carson

The Carson LensMag for iPhone 5 is a great addition for any iPhone photographer. For the past week, I’ve been given the chance to take some amazing photographs with the LensMag. Of course, the iPhone camera by itself is good, but these lenses bring out the finer details in small objects such as a penny, or even a grain of salt. The LensMag accomplishes this with the 10x and 15x zoom lenses that attach to the back of your iPhone 5.

Imagine a magnifying glass attached to your iPhone. Unlike other lenses, the LensMag is magnetic and easily attaches to the rim and back aluminum of your iPhone 5. The zero-hassle approach is great. LensMag is light, and your phone remains balanced while taking photos. My only side note is a lens like this requires a tremendously steady hand, or for the object to be laying on a hard surface.

The LensMag is available for $19. If you use your iPhone for photography, this is a great addition to bring the everyday items we see into a different light.

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Press for Android
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Press for Android is One Feature Away From Being The Best News Reader Out There

Press for Android

I’ve been testing Press since its release a few weeks ago, in hopes of writing a full review. I didn’t write a review because I didn’t see the point: Press is the best news reader for Android, and it’s a strong contender for Reeder’s design crown. The interface is minimalist without being stark, and the designers put in just enough features to give power users what they need without overpowering more casual news junkies. It works great on tablets, more than can be said for most Android apps, and syncs with Google Reader.

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OpenSignal: The Best Android App to Keep Track of Your Carrier (So Far) (Updated)

Open SignalNetwork signal apps on Android are a dime a dozen. Most of them manage to do a pretty good job gathering information about your network, but all but a select few fall apart displaying that data. It’s easy to gather and show exact information about signal strength, but interpreting that data and presenting your interpretation in a meaningful way isn’t as easy. It doesn’t help that most of the network signal apps in the Play Store seem to be built by and for engineers with a bare minimum of design experience (here’s looking at you network signal info or network signal booster). They’re great for power users, but not so good for casual tinkerers.

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